Free Home-Kit Single Grandparent DNA Test

Free Home-Kit Single Grandparent DNA Test

This test uses the latest DNA technology to establish the biological grandparent of a child.

Why use a Grandparent DNA test?

The Grandparent DNA test is usually used as an indirect way of proving the paternity (biological father) of a child when the potential father is not available for testing. Conclusive results are achieved in over 99% of test cases*

For this type of test, DNA samples are collected from a potential biological grandparent and compared to the DNA of the child.

The Grandparent DNA test should only be used if it is not possible to obtain a DNA sample from the potential father. If the potential father is available for a DNA test, then a Paternity DNA test should always be performed. Paternity DNA test kits are also available.

Single Grandparent DNA Test:

In this test, the DNA from a single grandparent (either the potential grandfather OR grandmother) is analysed and compared to the DNA of the child. This test should only be used if the second grandparent is unavailable.

If only one paternal grandparent is available for testing, it is very important to include a DNA sample from the biological mother of the child. This will increase the chance of receiving conclusive test results.

The DNA test kit contains three sets of mouth swabs and the cost of the test includes up to 3 individuals. If only one grandparent is available for testing, then mouth swabs should be taken from the potential grandparent, the child and the child’s biological mother.

If the child’s biological mother is not available for testing, advice should be sought by calling 0800 988 7107, and speaking to one of our trained Clinical Advisors. Depending on the situation, a different form of test (for example a sibling analysis) may be recommended.

How does the Grandparent DNA test work?

DNA samples taken from the mouth swabs provided, are used to generate a DNA profile for each test participant. The DNA profiles are compared and statistically analysed in order to determine the likelihood of the tested relationship i.e. the likelihood that the participants are biologically related as grandparent and grandchild.

The Grandparent DNA test is based on the fact that a child inherits half of his or her DNA profile from each of their biological parents i.e. half the child’s DNA profile matches their biological mother and the other half matches their biological father.

The DNA passed onto a child from their father has in turn been inherited from the father’s parents.

Due to this, biological grandparents will have a certain amount of DNA in common with their biological grandchildren.

When a child’s potential father is unavailable, it is possible to test the DNA of the potential grandparents to determine the statistical likelihood that they have contributed to the child’s DNA profile through their son. In essence, the DNA of the paternal grandparents can be used to reconstruct the DNA profile of the absent son i.e. the alleged father.

When should other forms of DNA test be used?

Grandparent DNA tests are not as conclusive as Paternity tests. Therefore, Grandparent DNA tests should only be used when the alleged father of a child is not available.

If it is not possible to perform a Paternity DNA test, a Duo Grandparent DNA test would be the next test to consider. If the potential grandparents of a child are not available and the alleged father has another undisputed child, then a sibling DNA test can be performed. If there is any uncertainty about the type of DNA test that should be used, please call Clinical Advisers on 0800 988 7107 to discuss your options.

Inconclusive Results

DNA tests are highly accurate and conclusive DNA test results are achieved in over 99% of Grandparent DNA test cases.*

However, as with any DNA test of this type, there is a small chance that the statistical analysis will yield an inconclusive result.

Inconclusive results are not the same as negative results. An inconclusive result means that the laboratory analysis cannot provide an answer to the question posed by the client.

Inconclusive results occurs in less than 1% of Duo Grandparent DNA tests.*

Causes of inconclusive results in DNA tests include:

  • All of the DNA markers that show matches between test participants are very common within the relevant general population. In these circumstances the matches do not provide the required statistical evidence to confirm whether or not a biological relationship exists.

 

  • There is a lower level of DNA matches than expected, between the DNA profiles of the test participants due to the chance nature of inheritance in families.

 

  • Where matches may have originally occurred, mutation has changed the DNA marker and caused mismatches at further locations within the DNA profile.

* Conclusive results are obtained in over 99% of Grandparent DNA tests when both potential grandparents and mother are included in the test i.e. Duo grandparent with 1 known parent DNA test.

We believe that DNA testing should be accessible to all, providing the answers you need to important questions about family relationships. 


Remember, if you have any questions about which DNA test is right for you, you can speak to one of our fully trained Clinical Advisors and get the expert advice you need.

£0.00

This test uses the latest DNA technology to establish the biological grandparent of a child.

Why use a Grandparent DNA test?

The Grandparent DNA test is usually used as an indirect way of proving the paternity (biological father) of a child when the potential father is not available for testing. Conclusive results are achieved in over 99% of test cases*

For this type of test, DNA samples are collected from a potential biological grandparent and compared to the DNA of the child.

The Grandparent DNA test should only be used if it is not possible to obtain a DNA sample from the potential father. If the potential father is available for a DNA test, then a Paternity DNA test should always be performed. Paternity DNA test kits are also available.

Single Grandparent DNA Test:

In this test, the DNA from a single grandparent (either the potential grandfather OR grandmother) is analysed and compared to the DNA of the child. This test should only be used if the second grandparent is unavailable.

If only one paternal grandparent is available for testing, it is very important to include a DNA sample from the biological mother of the child. This will increase the chance of receiving conclusive test results.

The DNA test kit contains three sets of mouth swabs and the cost of the test includes up to 3 individuals. If only one grandparent is available for testing, then mouth swabs should be taken from the potential grandparent, the child and the child’s biological mother.

If the child’s biological mother is not available for testing, advice should be sought by calling 0800 988 7107, and speaking to one of our trained Clinical Advisors. Depending on the situation, a different form of test (for example a sibling analysis) may be recommended.

How does the Grandparent DNA test work?

DNA samples taken from the mouth swabs provided, are used to generate a DNA profile for each test participant. The DNA profiles are compared and statistically analysed in order to determine the likelihood of the tested relationship i.e. the likelihood that the participants are biologically related as grandparent and grandchild.

The Grandparent DNA test is based on the fact that a child inherits half of his or her DNA profile from each of their biological parents i.e. half the child’s DNA profile matches their biological mother and the other half matches their biological father.

The DNA passed onto a child from their father has in turn been inherited from the father’s parents.

Due to this, biological grandparents will have a certain amount of DNA in common with their biological grandchildren.

When a child’s potential father is unavailable, it is possible to test the DNA of the potential grandparents to determine the statistical likelihood that they have contributed to the child’s DNA profile through their son. In essence, the DNA of the paternal grandparents can be used to reconstruct the DNA profile of the absent son i.e. the alleged father.

When should other forms of DNA test be used?

Grandparent DNA tests are not as conclusive as Paternity tests. Therefore, Grandparent DNA tests should only be used when the alleged father of a child is not available.

If it is not possible to perform a Paternity DNA test, a Duo Grandparent DNA test would be the next test to consider. If the potential grandparents of a child are not available and the alleged father has another undisputed child, then a sibling DNA test can be performed. If there is any uncertainty about the type of DNA test that should be used, please call Clinical Advisers on 0800 988 7107 to discuss your options.

Inconclusive Results

DNA tests are highly accurate and conclusive DNA test results are achieved in over 99% of Grandparent DNA test cases.*

However, as with any DNA test of this type, there is a small chance that the statistical analysis will yield an inconclusive result.

Inconclusive results are not the same as negative results. An inconclusive result means that the laboratory analysis cannot provide an answer to the question posed by the client.

Inconclusive results occurs in less than 1% of Duo Grandparent DNA tests.*

Causes of inconclusive results in DNA tests include:

  • All of the DNA markers that show matches between test participants are very common within the relevant general population. In these circumstances the matches do not provide the required statistical evidence to confirm whether or not a biological relationship exists.

 

  • There is a lower level of DNA matches than expected, between the DNA profiles of the test participants due to the chance nature of inheritance in families.

 

  • Where matches may have originally occurred, mutation has changed the DNA marker and caused mismatches at further locations within the DNA profile.

* Conclusive results are obtained in over 99% of Grandparent DNA tests when both potential grandparents and mother are included in the test i.e. Duo grandparent with 1 known parent DNA test.

We believe that DNA testing should be accessible to all, providing the answers you need to important questions about family relationships. 


Remember, if you have any questions about which DNA test is right for you, you can speak to one of our fully trained Clinical Advisors and get the expert advice you need.